Science/Mathematics Cultures and Education Forward to friends

  • View author's info Author Posted on Oct 21, 2005 at 11:31 AM


    Are there any math or science geeks here in the forum? I thought this might be a fun thread, a break from all the monotonous, dead-end discussions about religion and whatnot.

    I'm in school now studying to become a Space scientist. I've always been fascinated by Astrophysics and Planetary Science. Does anyone here keep up with NASA and its missions especially the proposed missions to Mars and to Jupiter's moon Europa? Europa's surface appears to be covered with nearly pure water ice and scientists continue to speculate whether a liquid ocean will be discovered beneath the ice layer. One reason for this is the presence of a network of ridges along the satellite's surface which may have formed from the pressure of warmer, slushy fluid pushing through the surface from underneath. Also the measurement of Jupiter's magnetic field around Europa suggests more evidence of a liquid ocean. And the presence of an ocean opens up the possibility of finding even primitive life forms on the moon.

    Or what about Pluto? Planet or Kuiper belt object? There's still so much we do not know about Pluto such as it's exact chemical makeup, although infrared spectra suggest it consists mostly of nitrogen ice.

    Are there any scientists/engineers here who are fascinated by this stuff like I am?
    Are there any math or science geeks here in the forum? I thought this might be a fun thread, a break from all the monotonous, dead-end discussions about religion and whatnot.

    I'm in school now studying to become a Space scientist. I've always been fascinated by Astrophysics and Planetary Science. Does anyone here keep up with NASA and its missions especially the proposed missions to Mars and to Jupiter's moon Europa? Europa's surface appears to be covered with nearly pure water ice and scientists continue to speculate whether a liquid ocean will be discovered beneath the ice layer. One reason for this is the presence of a network of ridges along the satellite's surface which may have formed from the pressure of warmer, slushy fluid pushing through the surface from underneath. Also the measurement of Jupiter's magnetic field around Europa suggests more evidence of a liquid ocean. And the presence of an ocean opens up the possibility of finding even primitive life forms on the moon.

    Or what about Pluto? Planet or Kuiper belt object? There's still so much we do not know about Pluto such as it's exact chemical makeup, although infrared spectra suggest it consists mostly of nitrogen ice.

    Are there any scientists/engineers here who are fascinated by this stuff like I am?
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  • View author's info Posted on Aug 05, 2011 at 06:33 PM


    I know very little about this subject, although I consider it interesting. However, I agree with Solong. There is always going to be some type of secrecy involved for as long as there is competition and the need to control another. There are no borderlines. They are open about what they want to be open with.
  • View author's info Posted on Aug 05, 2011 at 10:21 AM


    I've almost given up finding anyone post-grad like I am and going back to school to meet people in CLASS. That's probably the best way to ensure you meet people you have something in common with. In my case that would be medical, pre-med, or law students. Just plain science majors seem to have very little purpose and that's why a lot drop out or change majors before graduation. It's one thing to declare a major like "Organic Molecular Physics" (don't laugh, some colleges have that! I even saw one that had Hydrogeology) and then get a decent look around at the job market for people with majors like that and decide against it and wind up as a Teaching English as a Second Language major in the end. It's really only geared towards medical school or teaching, and if you can't stand the sight of blood or cutting into someone, and at the same time high school and middle school kids treat you like you look like unqualified trash when you walk into the room (or like you're a kid yourself that they don't have to listen to because you don't look any older than they are - bane of my existence!) there's almost no point in having majored in any "hard" science. And nothing else will hire you because you're "too smart" to work for them or what the heck ever reason they give.......
  • View author's info Posted on Aug 04, 2011 at 05:04 PM


    Quoting author:

    Are there any math or science geeks here in the forum? I thought this might be a fun thread, a break from all the monotonous, dead-end discussions about religion and whatnot.

    I'm in school now studying to become a Space scientist. I've always been fascinated by Astrophysics and Planetary Science. Does anyone here keep up with NASA and its missions especially the proposed missions to Mars and to Jupiter's moon Europa? Europa's surface appears to be covered with nearly pure water ice and scientists continue to speculate whether a liquid ocean will be discovered beneath the ice layer. One reason for this is the presence of a network of ridges along the satellite's surface which may have formed from the pressure of warmer, slushy fluid pushing through the surface from underneath. Also the measurement of Jupiter's magnetic field around Europa suggests more evidence of a liquid ocean. And the presence of an ocean opens up the possibility of finding even primitive life forms on the moon.

    Or what about Pluto? Planet or Kuiper belt object? There's still so much we do not know about Pluto such as it's exact chemical makeup, although infrared spectra suggest it consists mostly of nitrogen ice.

    Are there any scientists/engineers here who are fascinated by this stuff like I am?



    I'm a Biotech major, and being a science/math nerd is almost useless on most dating websites, especially the interracial ones. It's the reason why everyone I want to be with almost HAS TO be white or Asian. My fellow Native Americans, Latinos, and especially blacks, are the farthest removed from being science or math LITERATE never mind being "geeks" that ever existed in this universe or any other.

    God, I can't even find anyone to go with to "Harry Potter" movies.
  • View author's info Posted on Nov 13, 2005 at 02:11 AM


    Wasn't that 2004-FH, the 100'-diam. asteroid that missed us in March 2004?

    27,000 miles? That's still about 3.5 Earth diameters. Close, but not exceedingly close. Smaller rocks (but still quite larger than our usual meteors) miss us for much less, I remember the news about a 24' one that missed us by one Earth radius (~4,000 miles) last year.

    What I find exciting is the discovery of two new moons for Pluto. The old God of Hades won't be so alone any more. I wonder if they'll name one Persephone. The other could be, why not, Morpheus. After all, sleeping is like dying a little, sometimes.

    Well, the info was published here:

    [news-bbc-co-uk/2/hi/science/nature/4396546.stm]

    It may post this time, since it's not a c0m page or an "html" ending, and I got rid of the d0ts. Ugh.
  • View author's info Posted on Nov 11, 2005 at 07:52 AM


    Has anyone read about the asteroid/comet which is supposed to pass within 27,000 miles of Earth around this time next year? I've been looking for more details about it.
  • View author's info Posted on Nov 05, 2005 at 10:58 AM


    Well, there is a strong suspicions that NASA's research is kept along certain lines, and once one of such lines of research touches into something that may have novel military applications, then the research in that area is passed on to the Pentagon.

    There are many nuts out there too, but truth is there is current research on such things as bioweapons, chemical weapons, techtonic weapons, weather control and even radioweapons. No one really knows how far along the countries have come in their research programs.

    Articles that point in the direction of current research are publicly available, but the most specific research is kept, as a military secret, under wraps.

    The NASA itself is unlikely to handle any of the top secret lines of investigation, though. They have many people from other countries working there. Such sensitive material is kept by the military.

    If anything out of the ordinary were found (exempli gratia, rests of an ancient civilization somewhere else in the Solar System), I doubt the news would be immediately released to the public. It'd have to be cleared through the military, and there'd be a process to get people used to the idea--mass hysteria is not good for any government, as the Orson Welles experiment proved.

    Not that I think there's any chance of rational life in any other places of this system. At most, and I could bet on this, we're going to find microorganisms, and probably not even that.
  • View author's info Posted on Nov 02, 2005 at 06:59 AM


    solong write:

    I am, but I believe many of the technological breakthroughs are kept secret for military reasons. By that I mean keeping an advantage over other countries. So I think much of what NASA and other agencies are doing is good, but we are only getting 1/4 or so of what is really going on.


    Well, pardon me, Solong but it just sounds like to me you don't really know enough about the topic to say anything about it. I'm just trying to evoke a conversation about what others predict we may find when these missions are carried out. No I don't think most of what they are doing is being kept secret. Maybe some. NASA is who I plan to work for upon graduating from college and I happen to know they are quite public about a lot of their missions. Have you ever been to their website, read the articles in Discover or Scientific American or watched programs on TLC or Discovery? Don't assume that information is not available to the public.
  • View author's info Posted on Nov 02, 2005 at 01:53 AM


    Europa, Europa!

    Here on earth we have certain bacteria (archaebacteria to be more precise) who can survive in the most inhospitable conditions: extreme heat (over 100 degrees Celsius), high acidity (up to pH = 3) and extreme pressure (under the ocean crust). Some of them live in submarine volcanoes, feeding on stone and using sulfur to breathe (i.e. to get rid of unwanted electrons). Some of these guys have impressive names, such as "chemolithotrophic hyperthermophiles," a fancy way to say they get nutrition from rocks and soil and can tolerate very high temperatures.

    The existence of organisms similar to these archaea in Europa cannot be totally dismissed. That is, to me, fascinating.
  • View author's info Posted on Oct 25, 2005 at 10:57 AM


    I am, but I believe many of the technological breakthroughs are kept secret for military reasons. By that I mean keeping an advantage over other countries. So I think much of what NASA and other agencies are doing is good, but we are only getting 1/4 or so of what is really going on.
    I am, but I believe many of the technological breakthroughs are kept secret for military reasons. By that I mean keeping an advantage over other countries. So I think much of what NASA and other agencies are doing is good, but we are only getting 1/4 or so of what is really going on.
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