GHETTO WHITE GIRLS VS REGULAR WHITE GIRLS Message board Forward to friends

  • View author's info Posted on Nov 02, 2005 at 09:26 AM


    But yeah, if people would let people be themselves and stop trying to make them be the way "we" want them to the world would be a much nicer place indeed.

    Amen to that Loner! I completely agree you man.
    But yeah, if people would let people be themselves and stop trying to make them be the way "we" want them to the world would be a much nicer place indeed.

    Amen to that Loner! I complete agree you man.
  • View author's info Posted on Nov 02, 2005 at 05:52 AM


    The brawny weightlifter who also enjoys opera or the Marine drill Sargeant who does beautiful sculptures and some of lifes wonderful surprises.

    Alot of good things come in a plain brown wrapper!
  • View author's info Posted on Nov 02, 2005 at 12:24 AM


    And my bitter (not really) self will say this: if you want to get in a relationship, your chances are much better if you fit the corresponding stereotype for your race, at least in some points.

    Women don't look for Mexican guys to go see the Nibelungenlied, and they don't date a Japanese guy to spend the weekend singing hip-hop lyrics.

    I know, it's terrible of me having such opinions. Perhaps I'm just joking.

    But the other day I saw this prank played on people, on the "Just for Laughs" TV show: they had a dog with a hidden speaker walk to people in a park. The people would pet the dog (it was a pretty golden retriever, with the right collar and disposition), until they heard a goat's baaa or a cow's mooo through the speaker.

    Of course, they thought the dog was making the sound. And their reaction was horrified: they stopped touching the animal and quite a few actually took a few steps away from such incomprehensible creature.

    The situation of a person whose "culture" doesn't match at all the stereotypes is like that. And the moral of my story is, well, wait, stories don't always have to have a moral.

    Have fun.
    And my bitter (not really) self will say this: if you want to get in a relationship, your chances are much better if you fit the corresponding stereotype for your race, at least in some points.

    Women don't look for Mexican guys to go see the Nibelungenlied, and they don't date a Japanese guy to spend the weekend singing hip-hop lyrics.

    I know, it's terrible of me having such opinions. Perhaps I'm just joking.

    But the other day I saw this prank played on people, on the "Just for Laughs" TV show: they had a dog with a hidden speaker walk to people in a park. The people would pet the dog (it was a pretty golden retriever, with the right collar and disposition), until they heard a goat's baaa or a cow's mooo through the speaker.

    Of course, they thought the dog was making the sound. And their reaction was horrified: they stopped touching the animal and quite a few actually took a few steps away from such incomprehensible creature.

    The situation of a person whose "culture" doesn't match at all the stereotypes is like that. And the moral of my story is, well, wait, stories don't always have to have a moral.

    Have fun.
  • View author's info Posted on Oct 31, 2005 at 05:56 PM


    Very interesting topic here and good to see some very excellent responses. I may add some of my own 2 cents later but for now it's off to eat some dinner and get to bed. ;)
    Very interesting topic here and good to see some very excellent responses. I may add some of my own 2 cents later but for now it's off to eat some dinner and get to bed. ;)
  • View author's info Posted on Oct 31, 2005 at 07:18 AM


    I make it my prority to always be myself. Not to take on different airs to attract someones attention. People either like who I am or they don't. But I will always act like myself. I remember a few years ago a black male friend of mine made a comment about white boys wearing their pants so low on the hips. Told me he thought that was a black thing. I am always telling my son and his friends to pull up their pants. One of his friends literally walks out of his pants. My son isn't trying to be black it's just a fasion statement for he and his friends.
    I make it my prority to always be myself. Not to take on different airs to attract someones attention. People either like who I am or they don't. But I will always act like myself. I remember a few years ago a black male friend of mine made a comment about white boys wearing their pants so low on the hips. Told me he thought that was a black thing. I am always telling my son and his friends to pull up their pants. One of his friends literally walks out of his pants. My son isn't trying to be black it's just a fasion statement for he and his friends.

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  • View author's info Posted on Oct 30, 2005 at 11:37 AM


    I think I'll add my two cents. I grew up in a small, all white, town from the 6th grade to graduation. I moved around from one small, white town to another from the 4th grade to the 6th. About 99% of the time, I was the only black guy with two or less black girls to choose from. So, I secretly dated white girls. There parents weren't suppose to know, if you know what I mean.

    So, I talk like white people and black people let me know about it. I'm so tired of that. When I partied, I partied like white people, I didn't care whether I was the most fashionable. But, black people did.

    I found myself having to make some adjustments because of peer pressure.
    I think I'll add my two cents. I grew up in a small, all white, town from the 6th grade to graduation. I moved around from one small, white town to another from the 4th grade to the 6th. About 99% of the time, I was the only black guy with two or less black girls to choose from. So, I secretly dated white girls. There parents weren't suppose to know, if you know what I mean.

    So, I talk like white people and black people let me know about it. I'm so tired of that. When I partied, I partied like white people, I didn't care whether I was the most fashionable. But, black people did.

    I found myself having to make some adjustments because of peer pressure.
  • View author's info Posted on Oct 30, 2005 at 09:49 AM


    I agree, I can't stand it when I meet an attractive White Female and hear Ghetto Slang come out of her mouth. There have been times when I thought it was offensive, although that would give rise to thought as to what exactly is acting Black or Ghetto. Nevertheless, it's a turn off and I prefer a well-spoken White women who love Black men over a Ghetto-Slang woman anyday.
    I agree, I can't stand it when I meet an attractive White Female and hear Ghetto Slang come out of her mouth. There have been times when I thought it was offensive, although that would give rise to thought as to what exactly is acting Black or Ghetto. Nevertheless, it's a turn off and I prefer a well-spoken White women who love Black men over a Ghetto-Slang woman anyday.
  • View author's info Posted on Oct 29, 2005 at 11:54 PM


    cyupanqui write:
    How many Native Americans you see in TV shows? I've never seen as many as in the old Westerns, when they put 50+ for John Wayne to shoot dead.


    Actually even then it was 50 White guys dressed up like native Americans for john wayne to shoot Dead.

    But it is getting better slowly... Lots of the New Films have REAL Natives playing Native Roles...

    I was rather Disappointed with the Movie Wind Talkers because Nick Cage was the star... But Adam Beech was the Wind Talker... So the movie should have been called "The Guy who was assigned to shoot the wind talker..."

    The more we Push the Issue the more we will see change.
  • View author's info Posted on Oct 28, 2005 at 08:34 AM


    Hi Sam. What you mentioned about your son ties in to what I said earlier- as long as he's being himself, that's all that matters. There's a big difference between that and someone who attempts stereotypical affectations in an effort to be cool or accepted...especially when they're aimed at the people/culture they seek to gain acceptance from.
    Hi Sam. What you mentioned about your son ties in to what I said earlier- as long as he's being himself, that's all that matters. There's a big difference between that and someone who attempts stereotypical affectations in an effort to be cool or accepted...especially when they're aimed at the people/culture they seek to gain acceptance from.
  • View author's info Posted on Oct 28, 2005 at 01:29 AM


    cyupanqui write:
    ...
    Amazingly, and I'm going to keep on hammering this because my observations match the hypothesis, I think that exposure increases the chances of a people to be noticed, loved and even respected. Even negative exposure is much better than erasure.

    I remember a few years back, the Asian community in Hollywood was particularly vocal about the under representation of Asians in non-steriotypical rolls, or much of any rolls.
    More and more we are seeing the (tolken??) Asian friend in "the group." Still, not many lead rolls though.
    Speaking up seemed to make headway in film... not so much in television. Oh, but then television comes directly into people's HOMES...
    shouldn't have to BOTHER good, sponsor consuming, dollar spendiing Americans with TV casts who they can't relate to.
    Ummm, excuse me Mr. TV exec... take a good long look in the mirror and tell me WHO is it that is and isnt relating to your show's cast?
    Because last I looked, America is a nation of COLOR.
    Our ethnic diversity is so ... hmmm.... shall I say "diverse?" ;-) that we are known as The Melting Pot.
    We are palest of light skinned to deepest of dark skinned and every complexity of shade in between.
    We are educated and under-educated. We are rich and we are poor. We are assertive and we are timid. We are intelligent and we have Downs Syndrome. We are law abiding and we are criminals. We are kind and we are mean. We help each other and, too often, we hurt each other. We are whole in body and we live with infirmaties. We are old and we are young.

    And all this that we are spans all colors and all cultures.

    Yes, there are demographics within us. Some brought about by culture and some brought about by class. And some brought about by institutionalized forms of descrimination.

    But one thing we will no longer allow ourselves to be, and that is TYPE CASTED.

    *Sama hands the podium back to Cimmie*
    Hammer away! friend.
  • View author's info Posted on Oct 28, 2005 at 12:51 AM


    Amen RSVP!
    This topic and another one like it that was active some time ago... I couldn't help thinking, this is all such a steriotype.
    Does it matter what race a person is who buys into it?? Its still just one gigantic fallacy.

    Take for instance my son... 17years old, white, & into what I'll call for now certain musical expressions and modes of dress.
    This began in grade school, when we lived in the Seattle area. Most of the kids irrespective of race liked certain beats, used certain slang when talking to eachother, and preferred certain clothing styles -when the school wasn't 8 fashion trends behind & banning them as "gang attire."
    I never saw it as a "race thang" or a "gang thang" so much as an URBAN THING. Something that, long before my son was a twinkle, couldn't accurately be defined by race. Much like there being no racial BARRIERS to Skater Culture, Goth Culture, etc. etc.

    Fast forward a few years to a relocation to a rural area just outside of a smallish city...
    My son got so tired of hearing "You KNOW you're not black, don't you??" from all the farmers' kids. Well, he finally just started saying, "YOU know your not a DONKEY don't you??"
    Heck, he didn't change or put on affectations. He's known who he is for quite some time now, and is well aware that as a young person, who he is is still in greater stages of "fine tuning."

    He doesn't use drugs, do crime, disrespect anyone (except his parents sometimes... striving for autonomy & all that jazz, ya know), or carry any weapons -unless you count his pocket knife which his stint in the Boy Scouts clearly taught him was to be used as a TOOL, not a weapon.

    Is it really relevant to his character what music he listens to or that, outside of his work uniform, I'm constantly finding myself saying to him "Kid, pull up your pants!"
    ??
    Amen RSVP!
    This topic and another one like it that was active some time ago... I couldn't help thinking, this is all such a steriotype.
    Does it matter what race a person is who buys into it?? Its still just one gigantic fallacy.

    Take for instance my son... 17years old, white, & into what I'll call for now certain musical expressions and modes of dress.
    This began in grade school, when we lived in the Seattle area. Most of the kids irrespective of race liked certain beats, used certain slang when talking to eachother, and preferred certain clothing styles -when the school wasn't 8 fashion trends behind & banning them as "gang attire."
    I never saw it as a "race thang" or a "gang thang" so much as an URBAN THING. Something that, long before my son was a twinkle, couldn't accurately be defined by race. Much like there being no racial BARRIERS to Skater Culture, Goth Culture, etc. etc.

    Fast forward a few years to a relocation to a rural area just outside of a smallish city...
    My son got so tired of hearing "You KNOW you're not black, don't you??" from all the farmers' kids. Well, he finally just started saying, "YOU know your not a DONKEY don't you??"
    Heck, he didn't change or put on affectations. He's known who he is for quite some time now, and is well aware that as a young person, who he is is still in greater stages of "fine tuning."

    He doesn't use drugs, do crime, disrespect anyone (except his parents sometimes... striving for autonomy & all that jazz, ya know), or carry any weapons -unless you count his pocket knife which his stint in the Boy Scouts clearly taught him was to be used as a TOOL, not a weapon.

    Is it really relevant to his character what music he listens to or that, outside of his work uniform, I'm constantly finding myself saying to him "Kid, pull up your pants!"
    ??
  • View author's info Posted on Oct 27, 2005 at 09:07 PM


    Even now, in the 21st century, TV shows and Hollywood still protray most Black characters as either the funny sidekick or the tough talking guy or the funny easy-go-lucky loosemouth. The situation is changing slowly.

    All in all, even that is somehow better than the process of erasure other peoples have gone through. How many Native Americans you see in TV shows? I've never seen as many as in the old Westerns, when they put 50+ for John Wayne to shoot dead.

    Amazingly, and I'm going to keep on hammering this because my observations match the hypothesis, I think that exposure increases the chances of a people to be noticed, loved and even respected. Even negative exposure is much better than erasure.
    Even now, in the 21st century, TV shows and Hollywood still protray most Black characters as either the funny sidekick or the tough talking guy or the funny easy-go-lucky loosemouth. The situation is changing slowly.

    All in all, even that is somehow better than the process of erasure other peoples have gone through. How many Native Americans you see in TV shows? I've never seen as many as in the old Westerns, when they put 50+ for John Wayne to shoot dead.

    Amazingly, and I'm going to keep on hammering this because my observations match the hypothesis, I think that exposure increases the chances of a people to be noticed, loved and even respected. Even negative exposure is much better than erasure.
  • View author's info Posted on Oct 27, 2005 at 07:15 AM


    This goes to show the dichotomous way of thinking some people have about Black folk. Acting "ghetto" is perceived to be acting black. Whereas acting proper, educated, ar non-ghetto is perceived to be acting "white". This is an internalized way of thinking that affects blacks as well as non-blacks.

    It's sad that the African American culture has been reduced to (in the pop culture) nothing more than negative stereotypes. What's worse is that most people believe these stereotypes to be true.
    This goes to show the dichotomous way of thinking some people have about Black folk. Acting "ghetto" is perceived to be acting black. Whereas acting proper, educated, ar non-ghetto is perceived to be acting "white". This is an internalized way of thinking that affects blacks as well as non-blacks.

    It's sad that the African American culture has been reduced to (in the pop culture) nothing more than negative stereotypes. What's worse is that most people believe these stereotypes to be true.
  • View author's info Posted on Oct 26, 2005 at 09:42 AM


    Amen to that Slide. Excellent post!

    You are right. Black culture has had a world wide influence, affecting everything from fashions(clothing), to music and of course language and cuisine.

    Imitation may be the sincerest form of flattery, but I wouldn't want to be perceived as a buffoon, or an "act" in a minstrel show. And for many years
    Black people have been relegated to the roles of clowns. Think about the majority of the situation comedies of the past(from the 50's-present).
    How about the TV dramas. Most of the Black charcters are mostly "stock" characters almost invisible in terms of having a real "identity."
    Ooops, I'm digressing!
    I like women who show that they have an identity of their own. There is nothing wrong with having an admiration for other cultures, and I do make the clear distinction between admiration and emulation.
    Anyway....good post.
    Amen to that Slide. Excellent post!

    You are right. Black culture has had a world wide influence, affecting everything from fashions(clothing), to music and of course language and cuisine.

    Imitation may be the sincerest form of flattery, but I wouldn't want to be perceived as a buffoon, or an "act" in a minstrel show. And for many years
    Black people have been relegated to the roles of clowns. Think about the majority of the situation comedies of the past(from the 50's-present).
    How about the TV dramas. Most of the Black charcters are mostly "stock" characters almost invisible in terms of having a real "identity."
    Ooops, I'm digressing!
    I like women who show that they have an identity of their own. There is nothing wrong with having an admiration for other cultures, and I do make the clear distinction between admiration and emulation.
    Anyway....good post.
  • View author's info Posted on Oct 26, 2005 at 08:43 AM


    I agree with the author here even though I don't date women. Regardless of ethnicity, I don't like "ghetto" acting guys.

    If you cannot speak as though you have an EDUCATION, I won't even give you a second glance. I'm simply not interested.
    I agree with the author here even though I don't date women. Regardless of ethnicity, I don't like "ghetto" acting guys.

    If you cannot speak as though you have an EDUCATION, I won't even give you a second glance. I'm simply not interested.
  • View author's info Posted on Oct 26, 2005 at 07:19 AM


    It is sad that some white women act like Ghetto women.
    I'm wondering why are they doing that.
    I could not imagine acting like that.
    It is sad that some white women act like Ghetto women.
    I'm wondering why are they doing that.
    I could not imagine acting like that.
  • View author's info Posted on Oct 26, 2005 at 04:03 AM


    Amen to that, Phea.

    It's funny because I recall a lecture by a hip-hop artist on the college circuit. He mentioned how the eyes and ears of the world are on young black people....especially in terms of dress style and slang. I realized he was right. It amazes me how much certain cultural idiosyncracies have become universally co-opted, and we don't even give it a thought:

    "You shoulda gone to the party last night, it was DA BOMB!!.....You GO girl!!!!........Oh no he DIDNNNNNN'T!!!!.......Why she dressed like a 'ho?....Talk to the hand!.......Shout out to my homeez!!...Bling-bling....Dat's my baby mama/daddy....Whassap, yo?"

    Much of this is currently due to the influence of hip-hop culture. Historically speaking, it's not a new phenomenon- black culture has always been looked upon as a barometer of cool, exotic, or cutting edge- but I don't think we've ever seen it on such a pervasive scale. I may be wrong but it may have more to do with social barriers breaking down.

    It's all good, (there goes another one) but IMHO there's a fine line between cultural influence and minstrelsy. When it gets to the point where one assumes all people of a certain race talk/act a certain way, and attempts to act it out themselves in an effort to fit in or be liked, it becomes degrading. I think that's what NICE was saying, you can usually spot them from a mile away and it's a turn-off.

    I do wish more people would just be themselves.
    Amen to that, Phea.

    It's funny because I recall a lecture by a hip-hop artist on the college circuit. He mentioned how the eyes and ears of the world are on young black people....especially in terms of dress style and slang. I realized he was right. It amazes me how much certain cultural idiosyncracies have become universally co-opted, and we don't even give it a thought:

    "You shoulda gone to the party last night, it was DA BOMB!!.....You GO girl!!!!........Oh no he DIDNNNNNN'T!!!!.......Why she dressed like a 'ho?....Talk to the hand!.......Shout out to my homeez!!...Bling-bling....Dat's my baby mama/daddy....Whassap, yo?"

    Much of this is currently due to the influence of hip-hop culture. Historically speaking, it's not a new phenomenon- black culture has always been looked upon as a barometer of cool, exotic, or cutting edge- but I don't think we've ever seen it on such a pervasive scale. I may be wrong but it may have more to do with social barriers breaking down.

    It's all good, (there goes another one) but IMHO there's a fine line between cultural influence and minstrelsy. When it gets to the point where one assumes all people of a certain race talk/act a certain way, and attempts to act it out themselves in an effort to fit in or be liked, it becomes degrading. I think that's what NICE was saying, you can usually spot them from a mile away and it's a turn-off.

    I do wish more people would just be themselves.
  • View author's info Posted on Oct 25, 2005 at 06:36 PM


    PDXmuse write:
    Well, they say "Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery."

    I see lots of movies, TV shows etc. where these affectations are kind of glorified. Is their some maturity element involved?

    When you haven't discovered who you are yet are you more inclined to just follow the pack?


    A good point PDX:

    It's easy to follow what seems to be the "cool" or popular thing in vogue. Of course it has a lot to do with no having a clear sense of one's own identity.

    May we all find who we truly are and just BE THAT!
  • View author's info Posted on Oct 25, 2005 at 05:36 PM


    Well, they say "Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery."

    I see lots of movies, TV shows etc. where these affectations are kind of glorified. Is their some maturity element involved?

    When you haven't discovered who you are yet are you more inclined to just follow the pack?
    Well, they say "Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery."

    I see lots of movies, TV shows etc. where these affectations are kind of glorified. Is their some maturity element involved?

    When you haven't discovered who you are yet are you more inclined to just follow the pack?
  • View author's info Posted on Oct 25, 2005 at 02:33 PM


    Hello Silver. The world is keeping me busy, but I can't complain. How 'bout you?
    Hello Silver. The world is keeping me busy, but I can't complain. How 'bout you?
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